Saturday, July 18, 2009

Walter Cronkite: Only The Good Die Young


Walter Cronkite, long-time news reporter and anchorman for CBS News has died at the age of 92.

Labeled by many as “iconic” and “the most trusted man in America,” I cannot share that view of this man. Like Debbie Schlussel, I have no tears to shed for a man who held the responsibility of responsibly and honestly reporting the news to America, deliberately gave a false view of our involvement in the nation of Viet Nam during the 1960’s.

Much of America listened every evening to the man they trusted and never suspected that he was beginning the very biased news against America that helped lead America down the path of the communist nation we are now becoming.

In the Viet Nam War, many seemed to be surprised by the sudden attacks across the nation in the Tet of 68 offensive. Even though our intelligence was at best sketchy, American and South Vietnamese were not caught totally off guard and the offensive launched by the North Vietnamese Communist ended up a huge failure for the Communist North Militarily. Their numbers were decimated and it took many years for them to recover and launch the final drive South, defeating the South Vietnamese who no longer received any aid from America due to Democrat congressional policies.

In many regards the Tet of 68 Offensive was very similar to Germany’s Battle of the Bulge in World War Two, a desperate attempt.

It is ironic that Cronkite reported on both battles of desperation, accurately reporting the Bravery and steadfastness of World War Troops who pushed back the Nazi’s, but labeling our decisive victory in Tet as a “stalemate” and “unwinnable” in a broadcast aired on February 27, 1968 upon his return to America from Viet Nam and ending that broadcast with,

it is increasingly clear to this reporter that the only rational way out then will be to negotiate, not as victors, but as an honorable people who lived up to their pledge to defend democracy, and did the best they could.”


Abandoning a struggling ally is hardly “the best they could do,” as millions of Asians in Viet Nam, Cambodia and Laos paid with their lives as Communism spread across Southeast Asia and untold thousands more lost their lives as they desperately tried escaping the throes of Communism in rickety boats across the South China Sea in what was labeled the Boat People.

In an October 2000 speech, retired General Fredrick Weyand, who commanded II Field Force during the Tet of 68 offensive said in part,
After Tet, General Westmoreland sent Walter Cronkite out to interview me. I was in Command of the Forces in the South around Saigon and below and I was proud of what we'd done. We had done a good job there. So, Walter came down and he spent about an hour and a half interviewing me. And when we got done, he said, “well you've got a fine story. But I'm not going to use any of it because I've been up to Hue. I've seen the thousands of bodies up there in mass graves and I'm determined to do all in my power to bring this war to an end as soon as possible.”

It didn't seem to matter that those thousands of bodies were of South Vietnamese citizens who had been killed by the Hanoi soldiers and Walter wasn't alone in this because I think many in the media mirrored his view…”

When I was in Paris at the Peace Talks, it was the most frustrating assignment I think I ever had. Sitting in that conference, week after week listening to the Hanoi negotiators, Le Duc Tho and his friends lecture us. Reading from the New York Times, the Washington Post, the Herald Tribune, the Atlanta Constitution, NBC, CBS, you name it. Their message was always the same. “Hey, read your newspapers, listen to your TV. The American people want you out of Vietnam. Now, why don't you just go ahead and get out?” So finally a Peace Agreement was signed that everyone knew would be violated and with no recourse or hope of enforcement on our part.”


General Weyand went on to say he doesn’t blame the media entirely for the outcome of the war, but Cronkite’s words expressing how he had no intention of reporting the Battle truthfully evidence how the media spearheaded the anti-war effort at turning public opinion against the effort to keep the South Vietnamese free and towards supporting the Communist Forces of the North.

In short, he sold out America and our Troops as well as millions of Southeast Asians.

In the days ahead many will label Cronkite as “iconic,” “legendary,” and heap accolades upon him I feel are undeserved. Cronkite himself called what he said on Vietnam as his “proudest achievement.”

It escapes me how having the blood of millions of people, over 40,000 of which are American Soldiers on your hands could be seen as his “proudest achievement.”

Uncle Walt, as he was affectionately known, is gone. Dead at the age of 92 and who lived much longer than many of my brothers whose blood is on his hands that he sold out. His death at this ripe old age reinforces the old adage, “only the good die young.”

I have no tears for the man but offer condolences to his family and loved ones.

Others who sold out the Vietnamese and American Troops will join him one day. Jane Fonda, John Kerry, Ramsey Clark, Bill Ayers and so many others who today lavish themselves with the very luxuries they called for others to scorn as they spoke out against a free Viet Nam will also face the grim reaper in time.

Just as I hope and pray for Walter Cronkite, they too should face every single one of those well more than 40,000 American Troops their anti-American conduct helped kill on their descent to hell!

5 comments:

ddadmin said...

Wow, another famous person to leave. Walter (referred to as "Uncle Walt") was a great man that knew how to deliver news. I wish these noobs nowadays had such skills. Prayers to Walter's family and friends. In his memory, for his fans I have collected some great sites and articles (more than 200) to know all about Walter Cronkite. If you are interested take a look at the below link
http://markthispage.blogspot.com/2009/07/walter-cronkite-another-famous-person.html

Lew Waters said...

Interesting spam, but 'uncle Walt' is hardly considered a 'great man' by those of us who feel he sold us and the country out.

Wild Thing said...

Great write up about Cronkite, thank you. No tears here from me that's for sure.

Lew Waters said...

The country doesn't know what a dis-service Cronkite did to it, Wild Thing and unfortunately, too many don't want to hear about it.

Thanks for stopping in.

Storm'n Norm'n said...

No matter how great you thought he was he is still a traitor...I cannot honor a person simply because he died.
Cronkite was one of the so-called elite that was wanted to give up his country...see post here (watch the video) http://normanhooben.blogspot.com/2008/10/most-trusted-man-in-america.html